EVOLUTION MATTER & ENERGY  INFORMATION INTERACTIONS
 
Biology Place Lab Bench
Campbell & Reece log in
What You Should Know
Homework Calendar
Slide shows     videos
Handouts
Review games for this Chapter
Webstites for this chapter
Tutorials, animations, etc
 Password protected stuff
Other AP BIO websites
Get ready for the AP Exam

ECOLOGY
Chapters 50-55

Lab Day field trip pix

Wolves in Yellowstone-Everything is connected!
SCIENCE IN TE NEWS
Is Ricin Dangerous?
AP BIO INFO
BHS Biology webpage
(Stuff you should already know)
DDN GRADE CHECK
Riedell Science Home 
APBIO HOME
Countdown to AP BIO EXAM
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Note02.gif (247 bytes) Teacher help links
AP Central Old essays
 

 

 

 

Homework Calendar

MONDAY 3/24 TUESDAY 3/25 WEDNESDAY 3/36 THURSDAY 3/27 FRIDAY 3/28 SATURDAY 3/29
Take home Parade test due

Ecology Slide show

Bozeman video- Ecosystems


Slide show

Bozeman video- Biogeochemical cycles

BILL-cycles

Bozeman video-Niche

Home Range Activity
from Fred Holtzclaw
SHORT SCHEDULE ASSEMBLY

Opener


Check home range maps

Slide show

EARLY OUT @ NOON

HW: Watch Bozeman Videos- Exponential growth
Logistic growth

HW: Do problems 1 & 2 by MONDAY
From Jan Palmer & Jensi Kellogg-Andrus D2L Learning Power AP Biology


DON'T FORGET

Earth hour

Turn off your lights from 8:30-9:30 pm

SEE A VIDEO 
ABOUT 
EARTHHOUR

 

MONDAY 3/31 TUESDAY  4/1 WEDNESDAY  4/2 THURSDAY  4/3 FRIDAY  4/4


Check Exponential growth problems 1 & 2

Bozeman video-
Animal Behavior

Slide show
Home Range Activity due

Finish slide show

Bozeman Video-Information Exchange

Wolves in Yellowstone-Everything is connected!
Population problems due
DO LAB12 SLIDE SHOW

LabBench DO LAB


DO lab questions
From:http://www2.sluh.org

BILL-nomograph

HW: Watch Bozeman video
-Ecological Succession
AND TAKE NOTES IN YOUR BILL by FRI
Musical chairs essay discussion

HW: Watch Bozeman video-Ecological Succession AND TAKE NOTES IN YOUR BILL BY TOMORROW

WRITE IN CLASS ESSAY

PAST ECOLOGY FRQ's


AP BIO REVIEW CARDS VIDEO

Review cards

HW: BILL- connect your 2 words ala 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon

MONDAY 4/7 TUESDAY  4/8 WEDNESDAY  4/9 THURSDAY 4/10 FRIDAY 4/11
BILL- connect your 2 words ala 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon due

Correct essays
Lab 10 Energy dynamics

Collect Data
Parking lot ecology
Modified From:
Fred Holtzclaw
Cherry Creek AP Bio Workshop
Finish Parking lot ecology
Modified From:
Fred Holtzclaw
Cherry Creek AP Bio Workshop
ECOLOGY TEST
HW: Watch Bozeman Bio Immune System video and make a concept map of ALL "the players" by MON
MONDAY 4/14 TUESDAY  4/15 WEDNESDAY  4/16 THURSDAY 4/17 FRIDAY 4/18
  Lunar eclipse      

 

WATER TESTING FIELD TRIP- 2012

   
 

 

2011

 

2010

10lake4.JPG (1667736 bytes)   

 

Bozeman Biology Videos          
Lab 12
Dissolved Oxygen
Biodiversity Population Variation Ecosystem Change
Populations Ecosystems Biogeochemical cycles Animal Behavior
Niche Communities Ecological Succession r and k selection Aposematic
Coloration
Population Modeling Exponential
Growth
Information Exchange
               
               
               

David Knuffke's Prezis

Ecology 1: Behavior Ecology 2
Population Dynamics
Ecology 3:
Community Interactions
Ecology 4: Ecosystem Structure Ecology 5:
Conservation Biology
Ecology 6- Human Impact:

 

           
What's the Deal with Carbon? Tragedy of
the Commons
Best Climate Change Advert Girl Who Silenced the World for 5 minutes Big Question
What is Nature Worth
Big Question
Is Earth Past the Tipping Point
 
Animals Save the Planet Change the way you think about Everything Change the way you
Think about your Laptop
Change the way you
Think about food
The World is where
we live
The Power of One
       
Mr. W-Seven Ways to lose carbon          

 

Slide shows

POWERPOINT version

DOWNLOAD POWERPOINT
VIEWER HERE

Ecology in a nutshell      notes

Slides shows by Kim Foglia
Chapter 50 Biomes

Chapter 51-Behavioral Ecology
Chapter 52-Population Ecology
Chapter 53- Community Ecology
Chapter 54-Ecosystems

 

Mini-movies by Austin VanderWal       1 7 8 9 10

Handouts

Past Ecology FRQ's
What to Know-Ecology
Biogeochemical cycles

Mr. Knight
Ch 50 Ecology & Biosphere
Ch 51- Behavioral ecology
Ch 52-Population ecology
Ch 53-Community ecology
 

 

    

 

Remember: Biology is more than "just the facts". It's all about connections.
(That said... you have to know the vocab and concepts to be able to see the "big picture" and make those connections)

Review Games

Review What you should already know?
(Old BIO I & II slideshows/review games)

Ecology review
Bio hierarchy

Ecology quiz- Mr. Wanamaker

Climate change games

Ecology Review games

NASA- Earth day quiz

Footprint quiz

Mrs. Ferguson's self quiz

Game zone-Ecology

Biology corner
Ecology
Biomes quiz
Populations

Communities

QUIA GAMES
AP BIO Lab 12 quiz-Mrs. Abraham
Cycles, matter, niches, symbiosis-Mrs. Torres
Ecology- Mrs. Muniz

 Biology 101
 
Behavior quiz

  Population ecology quiz

Science Geek
Basic Ecological Relationships
Cycles
Populations and Interactions Change in Ecosystems 
Unit 7 Test Review

Levels of organization

 

Clermont College- Ecology

Backyard Nature- Ecology

Ecology overview

World clock

World Biomes

Biomes of the world

Biome characteristics

Ecomall

Create a food web

Nitrogen cycle

Carbon cycle

Food chains

Predator prey interaction 

Animated Nitrogen Cycle

A Website of Ecology Links and Activities

Virtual Biology Laboratory: Population Biology

Nitrogen cycle animation

Chris Jordan By the numbers

YOU TUBE- videos
How it all ends video

Global warming by the numbers-Environmental Defense Fund

 

 

Jeopardy template
Right click on link above
Save target as...
choose your "My Documents" 
OR jump drive
then fill in your own ?'s and answers
Flashcard template
Right click on the link above, 
Save Target as . . . 
choose your "My Documents" 
OR jump drive
then fill in your own ?'s and answers
Eclipse Crosswords
Make an interactive crossword puzzle. Click on link above. Choose DOWNLOAD Tab at top of page

 

 

 

 

ALL Body system projects due
FRI April 27

Part 1     RUBRIC
Part 2     RUBRIC

 

What You Should Know

Big Idea 2: Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis.

Enduring understanding 2.A: Growth, reproduction and maintenance of the organization of living systems require free energy and matter.

Essential knowledge 2.A.1: All living systems require constant input of free energy.

f. Changes in free energy availability can result in disruptions to an ecosystem.
      To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
         •  Change in the producer level can affect the number and size of other trophic levels
         •
  Change in energy resources levels such as sunlight can affect the number and size of the trophic levels

LO 2.2 The student is able to justify a scientific claim that free energy is required for living systems to maintain organization, to grow or to reproduce, but that multiple strategies exist in different living systems. [See SP 6.1]

LO 2.3 The student is able to predict how changes in free energy availability affect organisms, populations and ecosystems. [See SP 6.4]


Essential knowledge 2.A.3: Organisms must exchange matter with the
environment to grow, reproduce and maintain organization.

        a. Molecules and atoms from the environment are necessary to build new molecules.
          Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following:
          
1. Carbon moves from the environment to organisms where it is used to build carbohydrates, proteins, lipids or nucleic acids.
                 Carbon is used in storage compounds and cell formation in all organisms.

              2. Nitrogen moves from the environment to organisms where it is used in building proteins and nucleic acids. Phosphorus moves from the
                   environment to organisms where it is used in nucleic acids and certain lipids.

LO 2.9 The student is able to represent graphically or model quantitatively the exchange of molecules between an organism and its environment, and the subsequent use of these molecules to build new molecules that facilitate dynamic homeostasis, growth and reproduction. [See SP 1.1, 1.4]


Enduring understanding 2.D: Growth and dynamic
homeostasis of a biological system are influenced by changes in the system's environment

          Essential knowledge 2.D.1: All biological systems from cells and organisms to populations, communities and ecosystems are affected by complex biotic
           and
abiotic interactions involving exchange of matter and free energy.

                 a. Cell activities are affected by interactions with biotic and abiotic factors.
                 To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
                 •  Cell density
                 •  Biofilms
                 •  Temperature
                 •  Water availability
                 •  Sunlight

                  b. Organism activities are affected by interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. [See also 4.A.6]
                  To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
               •  Symbiosis (mutualism, commensalism, parasitism)
                  •  Predator-prey relationships
                  •  Water and nutrient availability, temperature, salinity, pH

                  c. The stability of populations, communities and ecosystems is affected by interactions with biotic and abiotic factors.
                       [See also
4.A.5, 4.A.6]
                   To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
                  •  Water and nutrient availability
                     •  Availability of nesting materials and sites
                     •  Food chains and food webs
                  •  Species diversity
                  •  Population density
                  •  Algal blooms
                   
✘✘ No specific example is required for teaching the above concepts. Teachers are free to choose an example that best
                                          fosters student understanding
.

Learning Objectives:
LO 2.22 The student is able to refine scientific models and questions about the effect of complex biotic and abiotic interactions on all biological systems, from cells and organisms to populations, communities and ecosystems. [See SP 1.3, 3.2]

LO 2.23 The student is able to design a plan for collecting data to show that all biological systems (cells, organisms, populations, communities and ecosystems) are affected by complex biotic and abiotic interactions. [See SP 4.2, 7.2]

LO 2.24 The student is able to analyze data to identify possible patterns and relationships between a biotic or abiotic factor and a biological system (cells, organisms, populations, communities or ecosystems). [See SP 5.1]



Essential knowledge 2.D.3: Biological systems are affected by disruptions to their dynamic homeostasis.

          b. Disruptions to ecosystems impact the dynamic homeostasis or balance of the ecosystem.
            To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
              •  Invasive and/or eruptive species
            •  Human impact
              •  Hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, volcanoes, fires
            •  Water limitation
            •  Salination
       ✘✘ No specific system is required for teaching the above concepts. Teachers are free to choose the system that best fosters
                      student understanding.

Learning Objective:
LO 2.28 The student is able to use representations or models to analyze quantitatively and qualitatively the effects of disruptions to dynamic homeostasis in biological systems. [See SP 1.4]

 

Enduring understanding 2.E: Many biological processes involved in growth, reproduction and dynamic homeostasis include temporal regulation and coordination.

Essential knowledge 2.E.3: Timing and coordination of behavior are regulated by various mechanisms and are important in natural selection.

         a. Individuals can act on information and communicate it to others.
            Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following:
              
1. Innate behaviors are behaviors that are inherited.

                   2. Learning occurs through interactions with the environment and other organisms.

        b. Responses to information and communication of information are vital to natural selection. [See also 2.C.2]
          Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following:
                    1. In phototropism in plants, changes in the light source lead to differential growth, resulting in maximum exposure of leaves to light f
                         or photosynthesis.

                    2. In photoperiodism in plants, changes in the length of night regulate flowering and preparation for winter.

                    3. Behaviors in animals are triggered by environmental cues and are vital to reproduction, natural selection and survival.
                   Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the above concept by using an illustrative example such as:
                  •  Hibernation
                  •  Estivation
                        
•  Migration
                        
•  Courtship

                    4. Cooperative behavior within or between populations contributes to the survival of the populations.
                    Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the above concept by using an illustrative example such as:
                     •  Availability of resources leading to fruiting body formation in fungi and certain types of bacteria
                     •  Niche and resource partitioning
                     •  Mutualistic relationships (lichens; bacteria in digestive tracts of animals; mycorrhizae)
                     •  Biology of pollination

 Learning Objectives:
LO 2.38 The student is able to analyze data to support the claim that responses to information and communication of information affect natural selection. [See SP 5.1]

LO 2.39 The student is able to justify scientific claims, using evidence, to describe how timing and coordination of behavioral events in organisms are regulated by several mechanisms. [See SP 6.1]

LO 2.40 The student is able to connect concepts in and across domain(s) to predict how environmental factors affect responses to information and change behavior. [See SP 7.2]

Enduring understanding 3.E: Transmission of information results in changes within and between biological systems.

Essential knowledge 3.E.1: Individuals can act on information and communicate it to others.

       a. Organisms exchange information with each other in response to internal changes and external cues, which can change behavior.
         Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the above concept by using an illustrative example such as:
           •  Fight or flight response
          •  Predator warnings
            •  Protection of young
            •  Plant-plant interactions due to herbivory
            •  Avoidance responses

        b. Communication occurs through various mechanisms.
           Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following:
             
1. Living systems have a variety of signal behaviors or cues that produce changes in the behavior of other organisms and can result in
                      differential reproductive success.
                     
To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
                  •  Herbivory responses
               •  Territorial marking in mammals
                  •  Coloration in flowers
                   2. Animals use visual, audible, tactile, electrical and chemical signals to indicate dominance, find food, establish territory and ensure
                        reproductive success.

                    To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
                •  Bee dances
                     
•  Birds songs
                •  Territorial marking in mammals
                •  Pack behavior in animals
                  •  Herd, flock, and schooling behavior in animals
               •  Predator warning
                  •  Colony and swarming behavior in insects
                •  Coloration

           c. Responses to information and communication of information are vital to natural selection and evolution. [See also 1.A.2]
            
               Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of the f
ollowing:

                   1. Natural selection favors innate and learned behaviors that increase survival and reproductive fitness.
                   Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the above concept by using an illustrative example such as:
                  •  Parent and offspring interactions
                •  Migration patterns
                  •  Courtship and mating behaviors
                  •  Foraging in bees and other animals
                  •  Avoidance behavior to electric fences, poisons, or traps

                   2. Cooperative behavior tends to increase the fitness of the individual and the survival of the population.

                  To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
                •  Pack behavior in animals
                  •  Herd, flock and schooling behavior in animals
                •  Predator warning
                   •  Colony and swarming behavior in insects
                    
✘✘ The details of the various communications and community behavioral systems are beyond the scope of the course and the
                                     AP Exam

Learning Objectives:
LO 3.40 The student is able to analyze data that indicate how organisms exchange information in response to internal changes and external cues, and which can change behavior. [See SP 5.1]

LO 3.41 The student is able to create a representation that describes how organisms exchange information in response to internal changes and external cues, and which can result in changes in behavior. [See SP 1.1]

LO 3.42 The student is able to describe how organisms exchange information in response to internal changes or environmental cues. [See SP 7.1]


Big Idea 4: Biological systems interact, and these
systems and their interactions possess complex properties.

Enduring understanding 4.A: Interactions within biological systems lead to complex properties.

Essential knowledge 4.A.5: Communities are composed of populations of organisms that interact in complex ways.

          a. The structure of a community is measured and described in terms of species composition and species diversity.

          b. Mathematical or computer models are used to illustrate and investigate population interactions within and environmental impacts on a
               community. [See also 3.E.1]

             To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
               •  Predator/prey relationships spreadsheet model
             •  Symbiotic relationship
               •  Graphical representation of field data
               •  Introduction of species
               •  Global climate change models

          c. Mathematical models and graphical representations are used to illustrate population growth patterns and interactions.
               Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following:
                   
1. Reproduction without constraints results in the exponential growth of a population.

                         2. A population can produce a density of individuals that exceeds the system's resource availability.

                         3. As limits to growth due to density-dependent and density- independent factors are imposed, a logistic growth model generally
                              ensues.

                         4. Demographics data with respect to age distributions and fecundity can be used to study human populations.

Learning Objectives:
LO 4.11 The student is able to justify the selection of the kind of data needed to answer scientific questions about the interaction of populations within communities. [See SP 1.4, 4.1]

LO 4.12 The student is able to apply mathematical routines to quantities that describe communities composed of populations of organisms that interact in complex ways. [See SP 2.2]

LO 4.13 The student is able to predict the effects of a change in the community's populations on the community. [See SP 6.4]


Essential knowledge 4.A.6: Interactions among living systems and with t
heir environment result in the movement of matter and energy.

          a. Energy flows, but matter is recycled. [See also 2.A.1]

          b. Changes in regional and global climates and in atmospheric composition influence patterns of primary productivity.

          c. Organisms within food webs and food chains interact. [See also 2.D.1]

          d. Food webs and food chains are dependent on primary productivity.

          e. Models allow the prediction of the impact of change in biotic and abiotic factors.
                 Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following
               
1. Competition for resources and other factors limits growth and can be described by the logistic model.

                    2. Competition for resources, territoriality, health, predation, accumulation of wastes and other factors contribute to density-
                        dependent population regulation.

          f. Human activities impact ecosystems on local, regional and global scales. [See also 2.D.3]
              Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following:
                  
1. As human populations have increased in numbers, their impact on habitats for other species have been magnified.

                        2. In turn, this has often reduced the population size of the affected species and resulted in habitat destruction and, in some cases,
                            the extinction of species.

           g. Many adaptations of organisms are related to obtaining and using energy and matter in a particular environment. [See also 2.A.1, 2.A.2]

Learning Objectives:
LO 4.14 The student is able to apply mathematical routines to quantities that describe interactions among living systems and their environment, which result in the movement of matter and energy. [See SP 2.2]

LO 4.15 The student is able to use visual representations to analyze situations or solve problems qualitatively to illustrate how interactions among living systems and with their environment result in the movement of matter and energy. [See SP 1.4]

LO 4.16 The student is able to predict the effects of a change of matter or energy availability on communities.[See SP 6.


Essential knowledge 4.B.3: Interactions between and within populations influence patterns of species distribution and abundance.

          a. Interactions between populations affect the distributions and abundance of populations.
              Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of each of the following:
                  1. Competition, parasitism, predation, mutualism and commensalism can affect population dynamics.

                  2. Relationships among interacting populations can be characterized by positive and negative effects, and can be modeled
                       mathematically (predator/prey, epidemiological models, invasive species).

                  3. Many complex symbiotic relationships exist in an ecosystem, and feedback control systems play a role in the functioning of
                      these ecosystems.
              
  ✘✘ Specific symbiotic interactions are beyond the scope of  the course and the AP Exam

          b. A population of organisms has properties that are different from those of the individuals that make up the population. The cooperation and
               competition between individuals contributes to these different properties.

          c. Species-specific and environmental catastrophes, geological events, the sudden influx/depletion of abiotic resources or increased human
               activities affect species distribution and abundance. [See also 1.A.1,
1.A.2]

               To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
                •  Loss of keystone species
              •  Kudzu
              •  Dutch elm disease

Learning Objective:
LO 4.19 The student is able to use data analysis to refine observations and measurements regarding the effect of population interactions on patterns of species distribution and abundance. [See SP 5.2]


Essential knowledge 4.B.4: Distribution of local and global ecosystems c
hanges over time.

         a. Human impact accelerates change at local and global levels. [See also 1.A.2]
            To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
              •  Logging, slash and burn agriculture, urbanization, monocropping, infrastructure development (dams, transmission lines, roads), and
                         global climate change threaten ecosystems and life on Earth.

              •  An introduced species can exploit a new niche free of predators or competitors, thus exploiting new resources.
              •  Introduction of new diseases can devastate native species.
                      Illustrative examples include:
                   •  Dutch elm disease
                   •  Potato blight
                      •  Small pox [historic example for Native Americans]

             b. Geological and meteorological events impact ecosystem distribution.
               Evidence of student learning is a demonstrated understanding of the following:
                  
1. Biogeographical studies illustrate these changes.
                       To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
                    •  El Niρo
                    •  Continental drift
                    •  Meteor impact on dinosaurs

 Learning Objectives:
LO 4.20 The student is able to explain how the distribution of ecosystems changes over time by identifying large-scale events that have resulted in these changes in the past. [See SP 6.3]

LO 4.21 The student is able to predict consequences of human actions on both local and global ecosystems. [See SP 6.4]


Enduring understanding 4.C: Naturally occurring
diversity among and between components within biological systems affects interactions with the environment.

Essential knowledge 4.C.3: The level of variation in a population affects population dynamics.

          a. Population ability to respond to changes in the environment is affected by genetic diversity. Species and populations with little genetic
              diversity are at risk for extinction. [See also 1.A.1, 1.A.2,
1.C.1]
                 To foster student understanding of this concept, instructors can choose an illustrative example such as:
              •  California condors
                •
  Black-footed ferrets
              •  Prairie chickens
                •  Potato blight causing the potato famine
                       
• Corn rust affects on agricultural crops
                •  Tasmanian devils and infectious cancer

     

 Learning Objectives:
LO 4.25 The student is able to use evidence to justify a claim that a variety of phenotypic responses to a single environmental factor can result from different genotypes within the population. [See SP 6.1]

LO 4.26 The student is able to use theories and models to make scientific claims and/or predictions about the effects of variation within populations on survival and fitness. [See SP 6.4]


Essential knowledge 4.C.4: The diversity of species within an ecosystem
may influence the stability of the ecosystem.

          a. Natural and artificial ecosystems with fewer component parts and with little diversity among the parts are often less resilient to changes in
              the environment. [See also 1.C.1]

          b. Keystone species, producers, and essential abiotic and biotic factors contribute to maintaining the diversity of an ecosystem. The effects of
               keystone species on the ecosystem are disproportionate relative to their abundance in the ecosystem, and when they are removed from the
               ecosystem, the ecosystem often collapses.

 Learning Objective:
LO 4.27 The student is able to make scientific claims and predictions about how species diversity within an ecosystem influences ecosystem stability. [See SP 6.4]

 

 


Biomes Travel Brochure Projects
Sam-
Nick- Taiga
Lindun - Wetlands
Yang - Rain Forest
Lynn - Savannah
Jamie - Intertidal
Gabe - Tundra
Megan- Desert
Mia - Temperate Grasslands
Courtney
Spencer

 

 

Chemistry of Life  Cells Cell Division Metabolism
Genetics DNA, RNA, Proteins Evolution Parade
Plants Body systems Ecology Exam Prep

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If you find something useful, would like to suggest new links, or have corrections...please let me know. 

 

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HOUSE BILL 1099

Rachel Maddow clip

http://blogs.forbes.com/sciencebiz/2010/03/south-dakota-legislature-declares-that-astrology-can-explain-global-warming/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/26/south-dakota-schools-shou_n_478724.html

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/loom/2010/02/26/this-is-the-dawning-of-aquarius-in-south-dakota/

http://www.tnr.com/blog/the-vine/south-dakota-makes-play-dumbest-state-the-nation

http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=385x438686

http://forum.thedailyshow.com/tds/board/message?board.id=story_suggestions&thread.id=22157

http://curricublog.wordpress.com/

http://progressiveerupts.blogspot.com/2010/02/south-dakota-to-teach-astrological.html

http://scienceblogs.com/tfk/2010/02/global_warming_deniers_want_so.php

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/02/south-dakota-resolution-schools-teach-astrological-global-warming.php

http://reason.com/blog/2010/02/26/south-dakota-legislature-votes


http://climateprogress.org/2010/02/25/south-dakota-legislators-tell-schools-to-teach-%E2%80%98astrological%E2%80%99-explanation-for-global-warming/

http://www.topix.com/state/sd/2010/02/global-warming-deniers-want-south-dakotas-teachers-to-deceive-children

http://thinkprogress.org/2010/02/25/south-dakota-legislators-tell-schools-to-teach-astrological-explanation-for-global-warming/

http://scienceblips.dailyradar.com/story/global-warming-deniers-want-south-dakota-s-teachers-to/

http://www.buzzfeed.com/forbes/south-dakota-declares-astrology-can-explain-global-13ku

http://foolocracy.com/2010/02/south-dakota-state-house-votes-that-astrology-should-be-taught-to-explain-global-warming/

http://newsodrome.com/ethnicity_news/south-dakota-legislators-tell-schools-to-teach-astrological-explanation-for-global-warming-14370839

 

Spring 2014

MONDAY 3/24 TUESDAY 3/25 WEDNESDAY 3/36 THURSDAY 3/27 FRIDAY 3/28 SATURDAY 3/29
Take home Parade test due

Ecology Slide show

Bozeman video- Ecosystems


Slide show

Bozeman video- Biogeochemical cycles

BILL-cycles

Bozeman video-Niche

Home Range Activity
from Fred Holtzclaw
SHORT SCHEDULE ASSEMBLY

Opener


Check home range maps

Slide show

EARLY OUT @ NOON

HW: Watch Bozeman Videos- Exponential growth
Logistic growth

HW: Do problems 1 & 2 by MONDAY
From Jan Palmer & Jensi Kellogg-Andrus D2L Learning Power AP Biology


DON'T FORGET

Earth hour

Turn off your lights from 8:30-9:30 pm

SEE A VIDEO 
ABOUT 
EARTHHOUR

 

MONDAY 3/31 TUESDAY  4/1 WEDNESDAY  4/2 THURSDAY  4/3 FRIDAY  4/4


Check Exponential growth problems 1 & 2

Bozeman video-
Animal Behavior

Slide show
Home Range Activity due

Finish slide show

Bozeman Video-Information Exchange

Wolves in Yellowstone-Everything is connected!
Population problems due
DO LAB12 SLIDE SHOW

LabBench DO LAB


DO lab questions
From:http://www2.sluh.org

BILL-nomograph

HW: Watch Bozeman video
-Ecological Succession
AND TAKE NOTES IN YOUR BILL by FRI
Musical chairs essay discussion

HW: Watch Bozeman video-Ecological Succession AND TAKE NOTES IN YOUR BILL BY TOMORROW

WRITE IN CLASS ESSAY

PAST ECOLOGY FRQ's


AP BIO REVIEW CARDS VIDEO

Review cards

HW: BILL- connect your 2 words ala 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon

MONDAY 4/7 TUESDAY  4/8 WEDNESDAY  4/9 THURSDAY 4/10 FRIDAY 4/11
BILL- connect your 2 words ala 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon due

Correct essays
Lab 10 Energy dynamics

Collect Data
Parking lot ecology
Modified From:
Fred Holtzclaw
Cherry Creek AP Bio Workshop
Finish Parking lot ecology
Modified From:
Fred Holtzclaw
Cherry Creek AP Bio Workshop
ECOLOGY TEST
HW: Watch Bozeman Bio Immune System video and make a concept map of ALL "the players" by MON
MONDAY 4/14 TUESDAY  4/15 WEDNESDAY  4/16 THURSDAY 4/17 FRIDAY 4/18
  Lunar eclipse      

 

MONDAY 4/15 TUESDAY  4/16 WEDNESDAY  4/17 THURSDAY  4/18 FRIDAY  4/19
PLANT TEST
Chap 29 & 30, 35,36,37,38.39

HW:
LAB 9 transpiration
?'s/graphs due

REGISTER FOR YOUR COLLEGE BOARD ACCOUNT so you can see your scores online this summer!

NHS Banquet
Bozeman video-Populations

Ecology Slide show
Guest speakers
USD Med School


Slide show

EARLY OUT SNOW!

Finish slide show

HW: Watch Bozeman Video- Exponential growth
Do problems 1 &
2

From Jan Palmer & Jensi Kellogg-Andrus D2L Learning Power AP Biology

PROM: SAT 4/20

MONDAY 4/22 TUESDAY  4/23 WEDNESDAY  4/24 THURSDAY  4/25 FRIDAY  4/26
Earth DAY
A Billion Acts of Green

Home Range Activity
from Fred Holtzclaw

Early out-SNOW DAY AGAIN
Opener

Check home range maps

Check Exponential growth problems 1 & 2

Population problems due

Free hour: Plant test makeup
Home Range Activity due

Musical chairs essay discussion

2010 FRQ
Lunch: Plant test makeup

WRITE IN CLASS ESSAY

Clicker Review
ECOLOGY TEST
MONDAY 4/29 TUESDAY  4/30 WEDNESDAY  5/1 THURSDAY  5/2 FRIDAY  5/4
NERVOUS SYSTEM DUE

REGISTER FOR YOUR COLLEGE BOARD ACCOUNT so you can see your scores online this summer!
Body systems

NFL Banquet
FIELD TRIP
Water testing

Scavenger hunt

Body systems
Feedback
Countercurrent flow
Cap & Gown Distribution/locker checks

Body systems
Take home body system test due TUESDAY

REVIEW
MONDAY 5/6 TUESDAY  5/7 WEDNESDAY  5/8 THURSDAY  5/9 FRIDAY  5/10

  AP CHEM TEST     
(6 gone)
FIND THESE ORGANIZERS & REVIEW
Osmosis compare
Mito/chloro venn
Cell compare   
 
Nerve/muscle transport

Transport comparison
Tonic comparison
Water will move

Know your molecules #1
Pro/erkaryote venn

Know your molecules #2
Photosynthesis Venn
Alt gen comparison
Know your LIFE CYCLES

Plant solutions

1 2 3 4 5  6  Labs
  2a  3a


REGISTER FOR YOUR COLLEGE BOARD ACCOUNT so you can see your scores online this summer!

REVIEW

Practice AP Exam

Senior Academic Awards night

 AP Calculus TEST  
(10 gone)


REVIEW

AP English Lit & Comp TEST   
(11 gone)
REVIEW

AP English Lang & Comp TEST
(11 gone)

AP STATS TEST @ noon (2 gone)

REVIEW

Spring Fling Dance

SUNDAY
Happy Mother's Day
Play this video for your mom

World Science Festival

Youtube
MONDAY 5/13 TUESDAY  5/14 WEDNESDAY  5/15 THURSDAY  5/16 FRIDAY  5/17
AP BIO TEST !

Pops concert
AP GOV TEST
(12 gone)

If I were you . . .

Koffee Klatch
AP US History TEST
(3 gone)


BiO Cookie contest

AP MicroEcon TEST 12-4
(5 gone)

SUB HERE
I will be gone to National Science Olympiad

AP Human Geog TEST
(2 gone)

SUB HERE
I will be gone to National Science Olympiad
MONDAY 5/20 TUESDAY  5/21 WEDNESDAY  5/22 THURSDAY  5/23 FRIDAY  5/24
SENIORS LAST DAY
DNA extraction

Choir Awards
Late Start
SENIOR BREAKFAST

Sports Awards night

Snow Day Makeup

Semester Test
LAST DAY 4th Hr
Snow Day Make up

Semester TESTS
NO AP BIO
MONDAY 5/28 TUESDAY  5/29 WEDNESDAY  5/30 THURSDAY  5/31 FRIDAY  6/1
MEMORIAL DAY
NO SCHOOL
SNOW DAY #3 MAKEUP ?

 


MONDAY 4/4 TUESDAY  4/5 WEDNESDAY  4/6 THURSDAY  4/7 FRIDAY  4/8
PLANT TEST
Write 2 plant essays in class

See TAKE HOME test results

HW: 
Body system project due APRIL
15
HW: Finish Lab 4a/4b graph due FRIDAY
Study for Plant TEST

ECOLOGY

Lab 4a?/4b graph
MONDAY 4/11 TUESDAY  4/12 WEDNESDAY  4/13 THURSDAY  4/14 FRIDAY  4/15
Biomes Flyer due at end of class

HW: 
BODY SYSTEMS WIKI due FRIDAY

Ecology test FRI

Dakota Step Jrs gone

Finish biomes/Wiki projects

Spring play@ PAC

Dakota Step Jrs gone

Set up lab 9
Collect Lab 9 transpiration data



Biome presentations

Collect Lab 9 transpiration data

Biome presentations



Spring play@ PAC

Test corrections due by end of day

Collect Lab 9 transpiration data

ECOLOGY TEST

BODY SYSTEMS WIKI due by end of day

Have a fun
(AND SAFE ! ) PROM

PROM

MONDAY 4/18 TUESDAY  4/19 WEDNESDAY  4/20 THURSDAY  4/21 FRIDAY  4/22
Body systems Body systems Body systems NO
SCHOOL
Earth Day 2011:
A Billion Acts of Green


NO SCHOOL
MONDAY 4/25 TUESDAY  4/26 WEDNESDAY  4/27 THURSDAY  4/28 FRIDAY  4/29
NO
SCHOOL
FIELD TRIP
Water testing ?
   

All that Jazz
MONDAY 5/2 TUESDAY  5/3 WEDNESDAY  5/4 THURSDAY  5/5 FRIDAY  5/6

REVIEW Starts with G

Find these organizers you made
 
1 2 3 4 5  6 2a 3a  4

Labs
by Kim Foglia

HW: STUDY STUDY STUDY

REVIEW

Practice AP Exam
2008 Stats

HW: STUDY STUDY STUDY

 AP Calculus TEST  
(3 gone)

LUNCH REVIEW SESSION
REVIEW

HW: STUDY STUDY STUDY

AP English Lit  TEST   

LUNCH TIME REVIEW SESSION

REVIEW

HW: STUDY STUDY STUDY

Thespians Banquet

AP US History TEST
(2 gone)

REVIEW

LUNCH REVIEW SESSION

Cap & Gown Distribution/Senior locker clean out 

HW: STUDY STUDY STUDY

Spring Fling Dance

WEEKEND
REVIEW ?

MONDAY 5/9 TUESDAY  5/10 WEDNESDAY  5/11 THURSDAY  5/12 FRIDAY  5/13
AP BIO TEST !


  AP Gov TEST     
If I were you . . .

Senior Academic Awards night

AP English Lang TEST

AP STATS TEST @ noon

(6 gone)

Butterflies
BIOBOOKS

DNA Necklaces

AP MicroEcon TEST @ noon

Koffee Klatch

AP Human Geog TEST
(2 gone)
MONDAY 5/16 TUESDAY  5/17 WEDNESDAY  5/18 THURSDAY  5/19 FRIDAY  5/20
Seniors' last day Late Start
SENIOR BREAKFAST
  Semester Tests 1st-4th hr
LAST DAY
Semester tests
5th -7th hrs.
MONDAY 5/23 TUESDAY  5/17 WEDNESDAY  5/18 THURSDAY  5/19 FRIDAY  5/20
SNOW DAY MAKEUP
TEACHER WORK DAY
       


BODY SYSTEM PROJECT
Your assignment is to create study aids your classmates can use to study for the AP BIO Exam

1) Research a body system:
    Use your textbook, library resources, internet, your Human Anatomy notes/resources
    from Mr. Caldwell’s class (if you have these), etc

2) Create a two sided study sheet for your classmates
    This should include a list of 10 important concepts/facts/ideas someone should know about the body system you have been assigned. 
You may add bulleted explanations but don’t make it too wordy. Use the “What I should know” sheets as an example.

3) Include a diagram of your body system with parts and functions labeled

4) Create a review game, interactive crossword, jeopardy,  or other online accessible game with 20-25 questions your classmates can use to review the information.

5) DUE DATE: APRIL 23
    You must have these completed and turned in by the time we get to our body systems unit.

 



MONDAY 4/12 TUESDAY  4/13 WEDNESDAY  4/14 THURSDAY  4/15 FRIDAY  4/16
Plant test due

Write plant essays in class
ECOLOGY

HW: 
Body system project due APRIL 23

Ecology slide show Short schedule
AM-STEP TEST
PM-Assembly
Practice Winkler method DO
MONDAY 4/19 TUESDAY  4/20 WEDNESDAY  4/21 THURSDAY  4/22 FRIDAY  4/23
FIELD TRIP
Water testing- Lab 12
See pictures

Scavenger hunt

Finish Lab 9 & Lab 4

Birds and alligators

Algae car

video

Finish Lab 12

ECOLOGY TEST

Review  Review

EARTH DAY-Do something nice for the planet!

BODY SYSTEM PROJECTS DUE!

 

Have a fun (AND SAFE ! ) PROM

MONDAY 4/26 TUESDAY  4/27 WEDNESDAY  4/28 THURSDAY  4/29 FRIDAY  4/30
 

Body systems

 

Body systems Lab 4 & 12 graphs/?'s due

Body systems

Ecology test due

REVIEW

REVIEW
MONDAY 5/3 TUESDAY  5/4 WEDNESDAY  5/5 THURSDAY  5/6 FRIDAY  5/7

  AP Gov TEST     
(1 gone-4th )

REVIEW 1 2 3 4 5  6  Labs 2a   3a

AP STATS TEST @ noon
(all here)

REVIEW

Practice AP Exam

 AP Calculus TEST  

REVIEW

(All here)

AP English Lit & Comp TEST   
(3 gone 4th)

REVIEW

AP US History TEST
(all here)

REVIEW

MONDAY 5/10 TUESDAY  5/11 WEDNESDAY  5/12 THURSDAY  5/13 FRIDAY  5/14
AP BIO TEST ! If I were you . . .

Butterflies
BIOBOOKS

Senior Academic Awards night

AP English Lang & Comp TEST
(3 gone-4th)

Butterflies
BIOBOOKS

AP MicroEcon TEST
(4 gone-4th)

 Koffee Klatch

AP Human Geog TEST
(all here)
MONDAY 5/17 TUESDAY  5/18 WEDNESDAY  5/19 THURSDAY  5/20 FRIDAY  5/21
Senior's last day

Projects due

Late Start
SENIOR BREAKFAST
  Semester Test
LAST DAY 4th Hr
Semester Test
LAST DAY 7th Hr